Wedding Entertainment Statistics

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011 at 12:09 PM by   

After the vows and after the last dance…

It’s very easy to have buyer’s remorse immediately after purchasing a big ticket item, but what about after the wedding has happened? I did some digging around and pulled together several statistics produced by top magazine surveys* in our industry. I felt that they would be good to share with everyone that takes time to read my blog.

  • During wedding planning, Brides say their highest priority is their attire, followed by the reception site and caterer – reception entertainment is among the least of their priorities. Within one week after their reception, 78% of Brides say they would have made the entertainment their highest priority!
  • 72% of all brides say they would have spent more time choosing their reception entertainment.
  • Almost 100% of those same brides say they would have spent more of their budget on the entertainment.
  • When asked 81% of guests say the thing they remember most about a wedding is the entertainment.

*These statistics were published in St. Louis Bride & Groom Magazine in 2003. Sources include: Simmons, 2001; USA Today, 2002; National Bridal Service, 2001; The Knot, 2002; Brides Magazine, 2001.

You are right, those are just magazines…

We all know that facts can be spun to favor the side you want. These facts were originally compiled by the national American Disc Jockey Association (they also have a snoozefest iPod wedding that makes a point). I would venture to say that they have a genuine interest in making the wedding disc jockey an ideal choice for wedding entertainment.

It’s too bad that someone else — someone that does not make their living as a wedding disc jockey — couldn’t tell us the important answers.

The Flirty Guide: How Much Should Your Wedding DJ Cost?

If you were looking for the answer on why you should stop hoping to get the average and start looking for the great ones, then I have good news for you. Stacie Tamaki, aka The Flirty Girl, has put together one of the best magazine style blog posts out there. She will boil it down and open your eyes to what you should be looking for… what you should be expecting… from your qualified wedding DJ or MC.

She will remind you why there is a common misconception of only having “cheesy” and “obnoxious” entertainment options. She will also break down your budget and tell you why everything you expected to spend is probably wrong.  Stacie will also tell you all the things to consider (insurance, contracts, equipment, etc), but more importantly she talks about the intangibles. Questions you can ask to really understand your wedding DJ or MC of choice.

Does the DJ you are considering care about your wedding?  Are they honored to be a part of your special day or is it just a job to earn money?

Then, just in case you really wondered why we are not all $500 floozies, she’s going to remind you why the Creme Brulee of Professional DJs ask for above average rates. The common misconception is that I show up, play some music and make announcements for about 5-6 hours, and go home. Stacie reminds the world that this is still a business, and like any business there is an overhead cost of staying in business (meaning the professional guys will still be around to perform on your special day).

The bottom line

It’s true. At the bottom of the post, you will see my name squished between some of my favorite people in the industry, including several local DJ/MC vendors that I refer when I am not available. The truth is that Stacie had written most of this story when she wanted to get feedback. I was happy to offer some input before she shared it with the world. I also think that you’ll find the comments, mostly from DJs, to be valuable — don’t skip them!

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  • http://MagnoliaJazz.com/blog Robbie Schlosser

    Nice article, Jason!  Good touch setting us up with those humorous, self-serving poll results, before launching into Stacie’s tour-de-force article.  Her piece, and all the comments following, provide a valuable service not only to brides- and grooms-to-be, but also to everyone who needs to know how best to work alongside a professional DJ.  Everyone ought to provide clients and colleagues information like this about their own services.